The answer to this question is not as simple as it might seem.   In fact, it can be downright confusing.  I’ll try to explain.  First, the easier part.  An insurance company owes its own policyholder a duty of good faith and fair dealing and all claims asserted by the policyholder.  This kind of claim it

Remember the awful accident the “Saturday Night Live” and “30 Rock” comedian involving Tracy Morgan?  As you might imagine, it led to high-stakes lawsuits by the people injured, but what you might not know is it also led to insurance bad faith litigation between Wal-Mart and its insurance companies.

The accident happened on a highway

Uninsured/Underinsured motorist or “UM” coverage is one of the most important coverages a person can buy.  State law requires all drivers to carry liability insurance, which is there to pay for property damage and personal injuries caused by the policyholder.  However, plenty of drivers violate that law every day and operate vehicles on the roads

There are three basic categories of damages a policyholder can recover if she wins a bad faith case.  Bad faith cases can be worth significant amounts of money.  In fact, a meritorious bad faith case can result in far more money being paid to the policyholder than what she was entitled to recover under the

The “legitimate dispute” defense is asserted in many, if not most, bad faith cases.  As noted in a previous post, using this defense, insurance companies often argue there is a “legitimate dispute” with the policyholder about the insurance claim in question, and there can therefore be no bad faith liability.  Policyholders often argue in response

As noted in a previous post, there is no comprehensive list of acts of bad faith by an insurance company under Oklahoma law.  Further, the legal definition of bad faith leaves a lot of gray area to be filled in based on the facts of each case.  As a result, the question of whether an